"Macro Art In Nature"

Explorations in the artistic world of macro photography.

Black And White Macro Photography.

No, … still nothing much to say or to write about today.
Seems that this brain of mine is simply tired!

Still, when I do have some time on my hands and I am running about on the internet to look at other photographer’s work, I have noticed that when it comes to macro photography, not many will convert their images over to black and white, … just to see if something becomes different, … something new for them to work with.

These images below were converted rather quickly as an example, not spending a whole lot of time with tones, etc.
Doing this though does help me to look at an existing image in a different kind of way, and maybe to think a little differently while out in the field.
It is something that I would encourage everyone to try on occasion.

** The second image below is a composite of the same image.

© 2006 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.

© 2006 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.

© 2006 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.

© 2005 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.

© 2006 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.

© 2006 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.

Everyone take care, … and have some fun shooting!
Michael

South Carolina

“Macro Art In Nature”

July 21, 2008 Posted by | abstract, art, blog, botanical, canon, composition, daylily, Digital, DSLR, fauna, Fine Art Nature Photography, flora, flowers, hemerocallis, hiking, horticulture, insects, landscapes, life, macro, Macro Photographer, nature, Nature Photographer, outdoors, paintings, Photo Blog, photoblog, photography, photoshop | , , , , , | 13 Comments

Top Ten Posts From “Macro Art In Nature” Since 2005.

© 2008 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.
“Daylily”

Well, ….. it seems that I have not had much to say or to write about this past year or so.
Have been busy with the family, busy keeping the business above water, busy creating a new body of work that I have yet to show anyone, … just plain busy!
It seems that when I do write something here in my journal, I have been repeating myself.
Maybe one day I will have something new to say.

I was digging around my journal the other day and looking at various stats.
One stat that I have not looked at in a long long time were the most viewed posts that I have created since starting this journal.
It was interesting to look at those stats, some which surprised me.

Here are the Top 10, most viewed posts since 2005.
** A couple of these are older posts moved over from the “Blogger” days, and I have yet to line up the images and text to match up with the existing WordPress posts.

1. Artistic Blurs In Your Macro Images Using Photoshop
2. Using The “Orton” Method For Artistic Blending
3. “Layers Of Gold” Macro – Using Reversed Nikkor 50mm 1.4 Lens.
4. “In Their World” Series – Unwanted Highlights In Your Photography?
5. Rose Stamen – 50mm Reversed Lens
6. What The Lensbaby “Should” Force You To Do!
7. Adding Space To A Image In Photoshop Using The “Free Transform” Tool
8. Michael Brown, Inventor Of The “Cram It” Method In Photography.
9. A Marriage Of Macro Photography & Georgia O’Keeffe Paintings.
10. Photography In Late Evening Light.

Oh well, ….. at least I wrote something! : )

Everyone take care,
Michael

“Macro Art In Nature”

July 6, 2008 Posted by | abstract, art, blog, botanical, canon, composition, daylily, Digital, dragonflies, dragonfly, DSLR, fauna, Fine Art Nature Photography, flora, flowers, gems, hemerocallis, hiking, horticulture, insects, landscapes, lapidary, life, macro, Macro Photographer, minerals, nature, Nature Photographer, odonata, outdoors, paintings, Photo Blog, photoblog, photography, photoshop, rock hound, rocks, slabs, Wildlife | , , , , , | 5 Comments

“A Day Of Discovering The Art In Macro.”

I already knew that a day of finding the art in nature and in macro was going to be a rough ride.
The forecast for the day was sunny skies, a high of 97 degrees, and the humidity levels were predicted to be around umpteen eleventy-hundred percent! MISERABLE!!
Still, I knew that there is always art to be found in a day of macro shooting.
It is always there. It is up to me to find it, and to create from what I find.

I started the morning trying to add some imagery to my “In Their World” series.
But on this day, even the insects must have been in hiding and trying to stay away from the heat and humidity.
Dragonflies, assassin bugs, … and that was pretty much all that I was able to find.
I started on the edge of the pond and in some shade, when this Halloween Pennant decided to venture into the shaded area.
I spotted it while looking through the viewfinder and the lens pointed right through a narrow line of thin grass.
The pond waters were fairly bright to the right, so I quickly added a polarizer to the lens to help tone down the reflections and to enrich the colors.
I knew that the details were not to be as crisp as many would prefer, but this is exactly what I wanted for my series.
I shot about a half dozen images, and the dragonfly was off.
I was pleased with it, as it gave the feel of a dragonfly that was in his elements and surveying the world around him, in his world, … “In Their World”.
At that moment in the day, I had found my first piece of art in the world of nature, and in the world of macro.

© 2008 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.
“In Their World” Series
“Halloween Pennant” – Dragonfly

Well, it seems that the dragonflies and assassin bugs were all on the prowl in the very bright and sunny areas around the pond. There were hundreds of them!
The assassin bugs were pretty much hugging the ground or clinging only a inch or two above the waters on thin blades of grass, so I ruled them out simply because I was already hot and very sweaty, and did not feel like laying on the ground. So, I concentrated on the dragonflies.
There were numerous types of dragons.
The Halloween Pennants, Widow Skimmers, Slaty Skimmers, Banded Pennants, Red Saddlebags, all were flying about, but the heat really had them abuzz with their various little rituals. Only the Halloween Pennant would actually take a break and sit still to where I could play a little bit.

I have always enjoyed shooting around waters where I could get at near the water’s level, and to have various grasses and lily pads floating within those waters which would give me a chance to play with depth in a image.
Of course, I love shooting early or late in the day near those waters, but there are times when shooting virtually at high noon gives you some options to play and to see the light and colors like you normally would not see if shooting early or late in the day.
With this image below, if shooting early or even late in the day, the waters would have been quite a bit darker because of the length of the shadows underneath the lily pads.
Shooting at high noon, the dark blue shadows pretty much remain right under the lily pad, opening up other areas of the water with lighter shades and color tones.
At times, and with a shallow depth of field, you can easily get a more splattered or blurred painted look.
Now this would be a good time to try and use your polarizer to help in toning down the tops of those lily pads, and some areas of the waters. Being almost on the same level as the water seems to work well while using the polarizer than it does when sitting or standing somewhat higher than the water level.
This shot is hand held, as I had plenty of light and calm conditions to get the dragonfly detail along with a playful type of background.

© 2008 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.
“Halloween Pennant” – Dragonfly

The heat started to get to me.
I went back to the car, grabbed some Gatorade, … and chilled for about a half hour.
I decided that was it for the day as far as getting back into any sun.
So, I went over to the area between the pond and the flower beds and in some shade.
I sat, I noticed the light, I see potential compositions, I change lenses, and then I create.
Using the tripod and the zoom lens coupled with the polarizer, and shooting through existing flowers and foliage, I found this image below. I also backed off on the focus just a little bit.

© 2008 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.
“Purple Coneflowers”

It did not take long for me to move over to one of my favorite flowers to photograph, one which has always given me something to keep in my files.
Every season I see many macro type images of the pistil and stamens within the daylily, (hemerocallis), that are very nice. But the one thing I notice that is often missing from those types of images, is that often the “grace” of the pistil and/or stamens are lacking. I often recommend to people who ask about photographing flowers, is to find the grace within that flower that you choose to photograph, to concentrate on that first and its composition, then play with your light, color, and depth.
When shooting daylilies, and whether you want tack sharp details or something soft, look at the graceful lines and elegance within that flower first, … and usually the rest will fall into place.
With the image below, it contains something that usually works very well in tying it all together.
The use of depth, … and the cradle method.
You have the pistil and stamens being cradled somewhat by the throat.
Then the throat itself is being cradled by the blurred pinkish rose color petal in the foreground.
Well, … it has always seemed to work for me! : )

© 2008 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.
“Daylily” – Hemerocallis

And then, … right when my legs are about to give out and I feel that the heat is really starting to do me in, and right when I am fixing to separate the Canon from the Gitzo, I see this lone blade of grass or wildflower right in the pathway between the pond and the flower beds.
It was getting late, the glow of the thin grassy area behind this lone blade of grass was so appealing, … so I took a few more moments.

© 2008 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.
“Still”

I arrive home at 7:30pm, I shower, I crash onto the bed.
I awaken, and it is now 4:15am the next morning.
I never heard the wife, … my sons, … nor my dog.
I get up, and I am hungry.
I grab a tall glass of cold milk, and a pop tart.
I go to the back porch to sit outside and get some fresh air.
I see a owl on the post out in the garden, something that I have not seen since January.
I know, that I had a wonderful day, and looking forward to what is right around the next corner.

Everyone take care, and thanks for visiting.
Michael Brown

“Macro Art In Nature” – Website

July 2, 2008 Posted by | abstract, art, blog, botanical, canon, composition, daylily, Digital, dragonflies, dragonfly, DSLR, fauna, Fine Art Nature Photography, flora, flowers, hiking, horticulture, insects, landscapes, life, macro, Macro Photographer, nature, Nature Photographer, odonata, outdoors, paintings, Photo Blog, photoblog, photography, photoshop, Wildlife | , , , , , | 7 Comments

Daylily – The “Cram It Method” revisited, using the Lensbaby.

Many of you are already familiar with my world renown “Cram It Method”, (chuckle), … but even using that method has its limitations when using a dedicated macro lens or maybe a lens with a diopter attached.
This is where a Lensbaby comes in handy, allowing one to selectively choose which areas to contain some hint of detail, while choosing the areas of blur and the amount of smooth transition needed within the areas of light and color. Just cram the LB, … and have at it!

The two following images were simple to create.
The trick to creating these abstract pieces were a simple matter of composition which is so important, using the available LB #10 diopter, strong back or side lighting (never from the front), selectively choosing areas to increase the lighting by using a small mirror, and the selection of a colorful subject that contains a lot of moisture content within its petal and throat areas, which helps to bring about those dynamic colors.
Also when creating abstract type floral images, I seem to lean more and more to using what I call my “Cradle Method”, which involves choosing your main area within the image that you would like to draw attention to, and then cradling that area with some type of base for it to rest upon. Putting it simply, … you have put your main subject in a cradle. The main subject is your baby, … so give it something comfortable to relax in!

You can also see some more of these daylily/floral abstracts in my Photoshelter Archives.

© 2008 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.
“Daylily” (hemerocallis) – Abstract


© 2008 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.
“Daylily” (hemerocallis) – Abstract

Taking some much deserved time off this week to catch up on a few things, … including some of those e-mails that I am so far behind on.
Hope everyone is doing well, … and thanks for visiting gang!

Michael

“Macro Art In Nature” – Website

May 25, 2008 Posted by | abstract, art, blog, botanical, canon, composition, daylily, Digital, DSLR, Fine Art Nature Photography, flora, flowers, hemerocallis, horticulture, landscapes, life, macro, Macro Photographer, nature, Nature Photographer, outdoors, paintings, Photo Blog, photoblog, photography, photoshop | , , , , , | 8 Comments

Daylily Petal & Throat – Abstract Macro

Hi gang!

Here, … still working, … still shooting, … still having some fun!
Have also been uploading some images to “PhotoShelter”, and will soon be tying that site in with the private site that I have had for the art consultants and various clients.
You can see just a few here, but I do have much more to add still and plenty that anyone has yet to see.
I lost all of my key words someway, somehow, … and it is painfully slow adding all of that back into the system.
The ability to purchase prints will soon be added in to the PhotoShelter site as well, so if anyone has money that is burning a whole in their pocket, ….. LoL! (I have no shame!)
Have also been working on a postcard or promo-card to send out to various consultants and agencies, … so yep, … my plate is still full until late in the year!

This image below is of a daylily flower. I simply sat the lens right on top of the petal, shooting wide open, and moved the lens toward the bright throat area while composing, … shooting.
Fun and easy to do!

© 2007 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.
“Daylily” – Petal & Throat Abstract

wp06daylilypetalfall41wp.jpg

Everyone take good care of yourself, … and thanks for visiting!
Mike

“Macro Art In Nature”

July 18, 2007 Posted by | abstract, art, blog, botanical, canon, composition, daylily, Digital, DSLR, Fine Art Nature Photography, flora, flowers, hemerocallis, horticulture, landscapes, life, macro, Macro Photographer, nature, Nature Photographer, outdoors, paintings, Photo Blog, photoblog, photography, photoshop | , , , , , | 14 Comments

“Daylily Stamens” – (Hemerocallis) – Macro

“Daylily Stamens”
(Hemerocallis)
© 2006 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.

wp06daylilystamens1wp.jpg

If there is one flower that I can always count on to give me something interesting, whether it simply be the flower itself or a visitor within, .. it is the daylily. (Hemerocallis)

With almost any flower, those that are fresh looking in appearance that has yet to be hit with a blazing sun or has not been invaded by winged insects usually gives the best results.
This particular daylily here has always given me something that appeals to me.
It is a pale lemon yellow daylily in color, and unlike many daylilies where the pistil & stamens are sometimes a bit deeper color yellow than the flower it is sitting in, … these stamens remain the same color as the petals of the flower. A fairly nice blend.
Then with this particular flower, those “pollen sacks” that I like to call them, will not open up very early like some varieties will, and at 10:00am they are still fresh looking and do not have the pollen scattered all over the place. They have just opened!
Another plus, is that these stamen heads have a much richer black to them that shows up so well, giving a wonderful contrasting “pop” when photographed in good light.

Find a daylily, and you will find many chances to capture some wonderful compositions, … and at times, … those little visitors that sneak around within.

Canon 100mm macro & 2x teleconverter
Tripod, macro slider, 2 plamps, reflectors
0.8 sec. @ f32
ISO 200

Thanks for looking gang!
Michael Brown

(This post does not have the original “Blogger” comments, as they would not automatically transfer when the move was made to “WordPress”.)

“Macro Art In Nature”

April 25, 2007 Posted by | abstract, art, blog, botanical, canon, composition, daylily, Digital, DSLR, Fine Art Nature Photography, flora, flowers, hemerocallis, horticulture, landscapes, life, macro, Macro Photographer, nature, Nature Photographer, outdoors, paintings, Photo Blog, photoblog, photography, photoshop | , , , , , | 17 Comments

Peace Lily Macro Abstract – “Silent Whispers” Series.

This image is just one in this series that I have been working on, with many more yet to be created.

© 2007 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.
“Peace Lily”
From The “Silent Whispers” Series

Canon 100mm macro
Available light & 1 reflector
1/50 sec. @ f2.8
ISO 400
Shadow/Highlight in Photoshop

April 14, 2007 Posted by | abstract, art, blog, botanical, canon, composition, daylily, Digital, DSLR, Fine Art Nature Photography, flora, flowers, hemerocallis, hiking, horticulture, landscapes, life, macro, Macro Photographer, nature, Nature Photographer, outdoors, paintings, Photo Blog, photoblog, photography, photoshop | , , , , , | 27 Comments

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