"Macro Art In Nature"

Explorations in the artistic world of macro photography.

“Early Morning Pond Scene”

© 2006 – Michael Brown
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“Early Morning Pond Scene”

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Well, … today I have a lot to say, but for some reason, I simply can’t get it down through my fingers and on to the keyboard!
Thought I would post a little something.
This is a simple image of some grass/weeds along side a pond that was photographed early one morning.
The ever so slight sunrise was enhanced in Photoshop just a bit, and I used selective saturation in other areas for balance.

Hope everyone is doing fine, … so take care gang!

“Macro Art In Nature” – Website

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February 26, 2007 Posted by | abstract, art, blog, botanical, canon, composition, Digital, DSLR, Fine Art Nature Photography, flora, flowers, hiking, horticulture, landscapes, life, macro, Macro Photographer, nature, Nature Photographer, outdoors, paintings, Photo Blog, photoblog, photography, photoshop | , , , , , | 12 Comments

Ant Macro – “In Their World” Series

© 2006 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.

Ant – “In Their World” Series

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This is another image from my “In Their World” series that I am not sure if I have ever posted before. So, here it is!

You can see a similar shot like this one by clicking on this link.

“Tuning In With Your Subjects In Macro Photography”

“Macro Art In Nature” – Website

February 23, 2007 Posted by | abstract, art, blog, botanical, canon, composition, daylily, Digital, DSLR, fauna, Fine Art Nature Photography, flora, flowers, hemerocallis, horticulture, insects, life, macro, Macro Photographer, nature, Nature Photographer, outdoors, Photo Blog, photoblog, photography, photoshop, Wildlife | , , , , , | 14 Comments

A Simple Flower Macro – The “Cram It” Method

Here again is a flower image that is a bit different than normally seen, and created simply by using my proven “cram it” method. (I’ll patent it!) : )
A client gave me some ideas for a piece that they wanted, and I came up with this. They accepted a piece that was very similar to this one in its composition. A fun and different piece!

“Flower”
© 2007 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited

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This image was created by simply cramming the Canon 100mm macro & Kenko 2x teleconverter down into the flowers, shooting wide open, and using selective focus for a certain area while letting the rest of the image to become a total blur.

If you wish, you can go to the “search” box over to your right, type in the word “cram”, and come up with other posts that has the “cram it” method or explanation mentioned.

Thanks for looking everyone,
Mike

“Macro Art In Nature” – Website

February 20, 2007 Posted by | abstract, art, blog, botanical, canon, composition, Digital, DSLR, Fine Art Nature Photography, flora, flowers, horticulture, landscapes, life, macro, Macro Photographer, nature, Nature Photographer, outdoors, paintings, Photo Blog, photoblog, photography, photoshop | , , , , , | 20 Comments

Photography. What The Lensbaby “Should” Force You To Do!

Opinion:

I have noticed some questions about the “Lensbaby” on various forums, and there almost always seems to be something lacking within those conversations about this tool.
All of the talk is about ease of use, “hey, … take a look at my pics” without much thought behind them, what can one do with it, etc., … but it seems the most important subject is rarely talked about.The one thing that the Lensbaby “should ” force you to do, (and is great for a beginner in my opinion), is that it forces you to decide what is the most important part of the subject that you are viewing, and it “should” give one a higher sense of “composition”.

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© 2007 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited

Recently, … or pretty much ever sense the Lensbaby hit the market, some of images created with the Lensbaby seems to have very little composition, which is so important to capture and hold the viewer’s attention. The Lensbabies are absolutely wonderful for abstracts, but even with some abstracts, and depending on the subject, some should have some type of compositional flow to it. There are those images that I have seen that have varying composition, little that really captures my attention, … and some may even be distracting to the viewer! A big glob of color is sometimes what I see. Now, … a big glob of color can make a wonderful abstract, but it seems to me that it works best if there is at least some kind of flow with one or more of the colors, …… at least! But often that can be missing as well!

The image above is a simple image to create with the Lensbaby. Here you see composition, and a composition that has a flow about it that makes it easy for the viewer’s eyes to follow. I focused my attention on the top portion, while letting the bottom portion to simply “fall where it may”.

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© 2007 – Michael Brown
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The second image is one that needed a bit more time and thought put into it. These cyclamen flowers were shot in a high-key lighting. I wanted the main area of the flower to be fairly detailed yet soft, colorful. The rest of the image was washed in bright light, and I wanted that to be almost a total blur. You can see that at least the main area has some detail, (you can tell what it is), and the rest that is in a blur at least has some “compositional flow” to it. It moves your eyes, … not leaving one’s eyes to play about all over the place and not knowing if or where to settle down within a “big glob of color!”

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© 2007 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited

So again, … the Lensbaby is a great tool to have along with you while out in the field. It is a great tool not only for nature type images, but for weddings, certain types of journalism, commercial, etc. Sure, you can do a lot of this type of selective blurring in Photoshop, but the Lensbaby can help train your eyes, to help them to see the composition, to force you to think and work with that composition, and then forcing the eyes and your mind to selectively choose what is the most important part of the scene that you are viewing, thus leading you in the important direction of how to enhance the entire image for overall impact and appeal!

Take care everyone, … now to answer some of your questions on these other posts. (I keep getting so far behind!) :)

“Macro Art In Nature”

February 16, 2007 Posted by | abstract, art, blog, botanical, canon, composition, Digital, DSLR, fauna, Fine Art Nature Photography, flora, flowers, hiking, horticulture, insects, landscapes, life, macro, Macro Photographer, nature, Nature Photographer, outdoors, paintings, Photo Blog, photoblog, photography, photoshop | , , , , , | 21 Comments

Lacewing Macro Abstract In High-Key, Using A Lightbox.

“Lacewing Abstract”

© 2004 – Michael Brown
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This image did not make the mass transfer during the move from the old journal to the new one.

This is a high-key abstract type image of a “lacewing”, using a lightbox which really helps with that high-key effect that one may want.
The light was a bit to strong for this shot, so adding a sheet or two of printing paper on top of the lightbox will help to cut down on the light if it is to strong for your subject in certain areas.

Canon 100mm macro & extension tube
Nikkor 50mm 1.4 lens attached in reverse to the macro
Tripod, macro slider, two reflectors, lightbox
1/1000 sec. @ f2.8
ISO 100

“Macro Art In Nature” – Website

February 10, 2007 Posted by | abstract, art, blog, canon, composition, Digital, DSLR, fauna, Fine Art Nature Photography, flowers, insects, life, macro, Macro Photographer, nature, Nature Photographer, outdoors, Photo Blog, photoblog, photography, photoshop, Wildlife | , , , , , | 8 Comments

Macro Dragonfly Wing – Using Lightbox & 50mm 1.4 Lens In Reverse

“Dragonfly Wing – Abstract”

© 2006 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited

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I had originally posted this in the old blog journal, and during the transfer over to WordPress, I must have lost it.
This image was created using the Canon 100mm macro, extension tube, and the Nikkor 50mm 1.4 lens attached in reverse.
I put this dragonfly wing on a old lightbox, which helped to illuminate and somewhat enhance the details found within the wing.
I also used a tripod and macro slider, which is a must for this type of shot.

Thanks for looking gang!

“Macro Art In Nature” – Website

February 9, 2007 Posted by | abstract, art, blog, botanical, canon, composition, Digital, dragonfly, DSLR, fauna, Fine Art Nature Photography, flora, flowers, hiking, horticulture, insects, landscapes, life, macro, Macro Photographer, nature, Nature Photographer, outdoors, paintings, Photo Blog, photoblog, photography, photoshop, Wildlife | , , , , , | 7 Comments

The Story Behind The Image

First of all, … many thanks to those who have written about the image that you see to the right side in the “About” section of this journal. It is without a doubt one of my favorites that I have ever created since it took me a number of years to get exactly what I wanted. I just did not think that it would create so much interest from viewers.

This image I consider to be my “intro” image for the “In Their World” series that is ever so slowly coming along. Not technically a difficult shot to create, but in my mind, … everything had to come together that fit my vision for this series. I have become very picky over the years, and this is one of the reasons why it took so long for this particular shot. I have a storyline, … and within that storyline is mystery and beauty. It has to be just right “for me“. (most important!)

© 2006 – Michael Brown
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Daylily – “In Their World” Series

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This image is of a daylily, or “hemerocallis“. I put the lens right on top of the petal and moved it towards the center or the throat area of the flower. I wanted a view, a feeling of how a small insect or other small creature might see it as they moved down that petal and to the center. Now one can view this for awhile and start to imagine just what that small creature in nature is thinking as he views it. Just what is he thinking as he moved towards the dropoff that leads down and deep within the throat of the flower. What does he think of that mass of vertical stamens on the other side of this deep canyon that reaches up to the heavens? I would imagine that yes, they do think of food, danger, mating, etc., … but what about their beautiful surroundings as they move along? Can they perceive colors as I do? I am basically a dreamer and explorer all rolled up into one, and have often wished that I were their size for a day. Again, ….. do they see beauty? Do they appreciate it the way that I do? Who knows, ….. but it is nice and fun to dream about it!

© 2006 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.
Beetle – “In Their World” Series

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This series that I have been working on for some time now involves colorful abstracts of flowers, but the key players are the smallest of creatures. I enjoy capturing them in the beautiful world that they live in. I do not care for the massive amounts of details that so many seem to be after in the world of macro. I want to show a magical place where these little ones live, and try to show it with some scale. After getting the images needed for my intro shot that I had been wanting, I turned to see this small type of beetle inside another daylily, who was just sitting there in one place, lifting it legs up in the air alternately as if it were dancing. I swung the camera around on the tripod, had a near perfect distance to work with, moved one reflector, and started to shoot. 1/320 sec. @ f2.8 with a ISO 400. He was showing me “his world”. I loved it!

I look at this small insect through the lens, and I know that we are different from each other. But I ask myself, ….. just how much difference is there really? What do we have in common? Maybe I can put it in a image of what we have in common!

“Macro Art In Nature” – Website

February 8, 2007 Posted by | abstract, art, blog, botanical, canon, composition, daylily, Digital, DSLR, fauna, Fine Art Nature Photography, flora, flowers, hemerocallis, horticulture, insects, landscapes, life, macro, Macro Photographer, nature, Nature Photographer, outdoors, Photo Blog, photoblog, photography, photoshop, Wildlife | , , , , , | 10 Comments

   

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