"Macro Art In Nature"

Explorations in the artistic world of macro photography.

Playful Compositions And Light In Photography

© 2006 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.

“Japanese Red Maple”

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Was out the other day down at my parents, when I decided to go out and do some shooting late in the day.
I felt that I needed to warm up a bit to get my thoughts into place, so I decided to run through my “stick drill” that I sometimes use before shooting.
This is a “Japanese Red Maple” tree that grows along the side of my parents home.
Similar to the “cram it” method that I use when shooting abstracts deep within flowers, I simply got in close to the center of the tree and to shoot outwards, looking for pleasing compositions among the leaves and those sticks/limbs, and of course, some good lighting.

© 2006 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.

“Japanese Red Maple #2”

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Try this method sometimes, by getting in close to a tree or some shrubbery and shooting outwards. You may feel a bit cramped at times, but the benefits are most certainly there for you!
Look for interesting shapes and patterns in a light that appeals to you.
Shoot wide open at first using selective focusing methods, and then adjust your lens settings and depth to suit your tastes.
And, try some of these very late in the day with that golden light.
Just go out and play, create something new, shoot it, and enjoy yourself!

Thanks for visiting everyone,
Mike

June 8, 2006 Posted by | abstract, art, blog, botanical, canon, composition, Digital, DSLR, Fine Art Nature Photography, flora, flowers, hiking, horticulture, landscapes, life, macro, Macro Photographer, nature, Nature Photographer, outdoors, paintings, Photo Blog, photoblog, photography, photoshop | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Tuning In With Your Subjects In Macro Photography. “In Their World” Series.

© 2006 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.
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Well, … it’s something that you simply have to learn to do, and it is a never ending process too!
To achieve that stunner that you have longed for, understanding your subject is key.

I was working this flower (daylily) for some abstract compositions, similar to the one posted the other day.
I do know that these ants enjoy going deep within the throat of the daylily where moisture has gathered at the bottom.
They will go all the way down, and then come up top somewhere at a particular point, and then return to the bottom.
The will often do this over and over again, returning each time to near exactly the same spot up top and pausing as if they are keeping a look out for something.
I set the lens on this position, open the lens for that soft/dreamy looking world that I enjoy capturing, and waited.
Sure enough, about every 30 seconds or so this lone ant would come back to the top at the same spot that I had the lens focused on, and he gave me a good 5 minutes worth of shooting before he deviated his path.

It is not exactly what I wanted, but certainly worth keeping in my files.

No matter what you are shooting, … try to understand it in ways in which it will eventually give you a unique opportunity for something different to add to your files!
In the end, you will usually learn two important things.
Something about nature, and something about your photography!

** Just noticed that this is sort of a repeat of a post I made a while back.
Oh well, … repeating it is not that bad I guess!

Thanks for looking gang!
Michael Brown – Photographer

“Macro Art In Nature” – Website

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(This post does not have the original “Blogger” comments, as they would not automatically transfer when the move was made to “WordPress”.)

June 1, 2006 Posted by | abstract, art, blog, botanical, canon, composition, Digital, DSLR, fauna, Fine Art Nature Photography, flora, flowers, hemerocallis, horticulture, insects, landscapes, life, macro, Macro Photographer, nature, Nature Photographer, outdoors, Photo Blog, photoblog, photography, Wildlife | , , , , , | 1 Comment

   

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