"Macro Art In Nature"

Explorations in the artistic world of macro photography.

“In Their World” Series – Moth Silhouette

This is the silhouette of a moth, sitting on the backside of a large leaf found at the Riverbanks Botanical Gardens here in South Carolina.

© 2004 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.

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(This post does not have the original “Blogger” comments, as they would not automatically transfer when the move was made to “WordPress”.)

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April 28, 2006 Posted by | abstract, art, blog, botanical, canon, composition, Digital, DSLR, fauna, Fine Art Nature Photography, flora, flowers, hiking, horticulture, insects, landscapes, life, macro, Macro Photographer, nature, Nature Photographer, outdoors, Photo Blog, photoblog, photography, photoshop, Wildlife | , , , , , | Leave a comment

“Doing It In The Bushes!” – Common Whitetail Dragonfly – “Libellula lydia”

All images © 2005 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.

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I knew that this little guy would keep coming back to the same perch, (Common Whitetail Dragonfly, (Libellula lydia), so I simply sat down right in the middle of a large clump of bushes and had a wonderful time shooting while trying different lighting techniques and various lens setups.

The vertical shot really appeals to me, although I do wish that the main subject was higher in the frame along with the background foliage. The only problem was the old wooden fence railing a few inches away from him and my limited space to sit in.
Took this shot with the Canon 75-300mm lens.

The horizontal was made a few feet farther away, using the Canon 100mm macro and the 2X teleconverter.
Both shots were made using 1 reflector and the Canon 420EX flash.

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Wonderfully creative and colorful shots can be made, if you have a touch of patience for your subjects to reveal themselves.

So this season, ………. do it in the bushes!!

(This post does not have the original “Blogger” comments, as they would not automatically transfer when the move was made to “WordPress”.) Image was captured at the Clemson Research Center near Columbia, South Carolina.

April 18, 2006 Posted by | abstract, art, blog, botanical, canon, composition, Digital, dragonflies, dragonfly, DSLR, fauna, Fine Art Nature Photography, flora, flowers, hiking, horticulture, insects, landscapes, life, macro, Macro Photographer, nature, Nature Photographer, odonata, outdoors, Photo Blog, photoblog, photography, photoshop, Wildlife | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Using The “Orton” Method For Artistic Blending

© 2004 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.

magbridge1blog.jpgIf you want a bit of fun, a chance to perk up some of those photos and to simply try something different, try this method here for a touch of that “painterly” look. It gives some of the photos you may work on a touch of softness, rich colors in some areas, and maybe something that you have been looking for to add to your bag of tricks.
I have found that this method works extremely well with landscapes, and I have also been experimenting using this method with some of the macro type shots that I have on hand.

The images you see here were created with a digital camera, and worked with in Photoshop CS using the “Orton” method.
Simple and easy to do.

© 2005 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.

241_4116c1blog.jpg*Open up Photoshop and select a image you would like to use.
*Then, go to “Image”, then down to “Duplicate”.
*Now delete your original so you will not make any mistakes with your original photo.
*Go to “Image”, then click on “Apply Image”.
*The “Apply Image” box will appear.
*Set the blending to “Screen”, and your opacity to 100%. Click Okay button.
*Go again to “Image”, down to “Duplicate”.
*With the image you have just duplicated, go to “Filter”, down to “Blur-Gaussian Blur”.
*Set the blur anywhere from 20 to 50. Click okay button.
*Using your “move tool”, grab the blurred image and drag it on top of your first image and placing it evenly on top. (the image with details)
*Open your “layers” box by going to “Windows”, down to “Layers”.
*In that layers box, set the blending mode from “normal” to “multiply”.
*You can now make some adjustments with levels/curves/sharpening/etc. while switching back and forth between your background layer and your other layer.
*When happy with what you see, flatten your image by going to “Layer”, then down to “Flatten”.
*Then, ……… save your masterpiece!

© 2004 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.

162_6294bcopy13nsnp1.jpgAdmittedly, some images do work better than others. You just have to experiment.With landscapes, it does seem to be easier to do while using this method.
With any type of macros, and having a smooth/clean background, you can see a type of blurred halo around your subject. Less noticeable halos occurr when the background has more details.

It is something that is fun to do, and thought I would share it with you guys.
Back to work for me, … so everyone take good care of yourselves!!

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“Macro Art In Nature” – Website

April 12, 2006 Posted by | abstract, art, blog, Blogroll, botanical, canon, composition, Digital, DSLR, Fine Art Nature Photography, flora, flowers, gems, hiking, horticulture, insects, landscapes, lapidary, life, macro, Macro Photographer, minerals, nature, Nature Photographer, odonata, outdoors, paintings, Photo Blog, photoblog, photography, photoshop, rock hound, rocks, slabs, Wildlife | , , , , , | 11 Comments

Seeing The Beauty Within The Deformed – “Kerria Japonica” – Japanese Rose.

This is a shot of a Japanese Rose that I took last season at the Riverbanks Botanical Gardens here in Columbia, South Carolina.

© 2005 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.

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I was hanging out within this large grouping of flowers, when I noticed this stunted or deformed bloom that was not opening properly.
I liked the form it was showing, and really fell in love with the background of foliage and a stained glass window off to the right.

Thanks for visiting everyone!

“Macro Art In Nature” – Website

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April 5, 2006 Posted by | abstract, art, blog, botanical, canon, composition, Digital, DSLR, Fine Art Nature Photography, flora, flowers, hiking, horticulture, landscapes, life, macro, Macro Photographer, nature, Nature Photographer, outdoors, paintings, Photo Blog, photoblog, photography, photoshop | , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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