"Macro Art In Nature"

Explorations in the artistic world of macro photography.

How To Get Something From Nothing In Macro Photography!

© 2005 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.

Getting something from nothing can be very easy, if you simply apply some techniques that I have talked about since the first day of this blog.
Oh now, … there are times where you can work a subject to death with this certain technique and still come away with something to feed that trash can, but it will give you more of a fighting chance to get a few keepers for your files.
So, as I have said many times before, “shoot wide open” to start with!

In this shot, I was crawling around on the ground and in a area where there were a few bare spots in the grass.
I noticed this spent bloom sitting out and away from the other grasses.
My first shot was at a setting I still had from another shot I was attempting, a setting of f8.
There was absolutely nothing about that shot that appealed to me, as the grasses in the background were to much in focus and that spent bloom up front pretty much blended in.
Shooting this at f2.8 allowed me to get that spent bloom with some details and throwing the colorful fall grasses in the background into a softer blur.

As I have said before, that so many times in the world of macro photography I have heard individuals preaching about details, and there is absolutely nothing wrong with that and is something that should be learned. But, the other end of macro should be learned also, and is a area of macro photography that I personally prefer.
Try shooting wide open first, “then make your adjustments for more detail” if needed.
This scene here was downright ugly to the eye, until viewed through the lens that was set wide open!
Shooting wide open also allows greater flexibility with faster shutter speeds, a lower ISO setting if you prefer, and you will not need a tripod on many of your shots.
Just make sure (and I feel that this is very important), that if you shoot wide open, determine which is the most important part of your subject that you would like to have in focus (selective focusing), then simply let the rest fall into place.

I will say this, that I honestly feel that shooting wide open “will always” give you a much greater chance to capture something from nothing in the world of macro!
Just try it!

Thanks for looking everyone!

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“Macro Art In Nature” – Website

March 2, 2006 Posted by | abstract, art, blog, botanical, canon, composition, Digital, DSLR, Fine Art Nature Photography, flora, flowers, hiking, horticulture, landscapes, life, macro, Macro Photographer, nature, Nature Photographer, outdoors, Photo Blog, photoblog, photography, photoshop | , , , , , | 12 Comments

Subject Distance & Backgrounds In Photography.

© 2005 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.

“Halloween Pennant” Dragonfly – (Celithemis eponina)

wp05halloweenpennant1wp.jpg

I really enjoy laying back and to take in my surroundings while out in nature. I also like to photograph those subjects as I see them in their world, and to do it in a way which shows their surroundings in an appealing way.
It can be quite difficult at times to show those surroundings in a subtle way because of the distance objects may have from your subject, so I usually can handle this by simply selecting a lens setting for instance in the f8 to f11 range, which tends to soften up that background yet still leave enough details to show what kind of world you are viewing. With these lens settings, you may have a difficult time in keeping your entire subject sharp, so try to get yourself and the camera lens on the same plain to your subject.

© 2005 – Michael Brown
* Copying/downloading of images is prohibited.

“Halloween Pennant” Dragonfly – (Celithemis eponina)

wp05halloweenpennant2wp.jpg

Plus, another factor is your light. It really helps the overall appeal to that background if you shoot like this on a cloudy day. Having deep dark shadows or very bright highlights can be very distracting, and pull one’s eyes away from the main subject.
Soft backgrounds that holds details, yet it still lets your main subject to take center stage can really produce some images you will happily keep in your files!
The first image was shot at 1/250 sec., lens setting of f10, and the ISO at 400.
The second image was shot at 1/200 sec., lens setting of f13, and the ISO of 400.

Thanks for looking gang!

March 2, 2006 Posted by | abstract, art, blog, botanical, canon, composition, Digital, dragonfly, DSLR, fauna, Fine Art Nature Photography, flora, flowers, hiking, horticulture, insects, landscapes, life, macro, Macro Photographer, nature, Nature Photographer, outdoors, Photo Blog, photoblog, photography, photoshop, Wildlife | , , , , , | 20 Comments

   

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